World news

Why there's been a big drop in women coaches under Title IX

As a synchronized swimmer in college, Kathy Delaney-Smith did not seem destined to become Harvard?s star women?s basketball coach. When she interviewed for a swim coach position in Boston?s southwestern suburbs back in the early 1970s, the superintendent asked if she could also coach their basketball team.

Finding Somaliland's ancient cave art is hard. Protecting it could be harder.

Hidden in the Somali desert, beneath stunning, ancient rock cave paintings, the thin trail of a snake traces a winding line across the dust. Somaliland?s most prized archaeological treasures ? which locals fearfully called ?the place of the devils? for centuries ? could not be more remote. Exposed to the elements, the colors have changed since caretaker Musa Abdi Jama first saw them at a distance in 1969.

After brinkmanship, a diplomatic opening with North Korea

For more than two decades, North Korea?s pursuit of nuclear weapons and the missiles to deliver them long distances has prompted recurring international crises. Sudden bursts of heightened tension, primarily between the North and the United States, were interspersed with diplomacy that never definitively halted the gathering storm. After a week of brinkmanship and escalating rhetoric between the two sides, Pyongyang and Washington suddenly found themselves at perhaps the most dangerous moment in more than 60 years ? with some declaring that the window to anything but a military solution to the crisis had nearly closed.

Meet the Raging Grannies, Portland's not-so-secret warriors for civility

One of the most beloved social activist groups in this Pacific Northwest city, they are the Raging Grannies. ?Grannying is the least understood and most powerful weapon we have,? says Granny Rose de Shaw.





Combine Flights?